Geneva - Heads of State and Government, TB survivors, affected communities, technical partners, researchers, private sector representatives, and other key stakeholders will descend on New York next week to put TB in the spotlight. The week will be marked by several side-events organized and supported by multiple Permanent Country Missions to the UN in New York and numerous TB stakeholders, including but not limited to the Stop TB Partnership, WHO, USAID, WEF, Global Fund, African Union, IFRC, KNCV, MSH, PATH, UNITAID, UNICEF, UNAIDS, UNF, CDC, GFAN, OSF, PIH, TB People, Nikkei and J&J.

This year’s theme for World AIDS Day, which will be marking its 30th anniversary on 1 December, will be “Know your status”.

Significant progress has been made in the AIDS response since 1988, and today three in four people living with HIV know their status. But we still have miles to go, as the latest UNAIDS report shows, and that includes reaching people living with HIV who do not know their status and ensuring that they are linked to quality care and prevention services.

We are making extraordinary progress in the fight against HIV, tuberculosis and malaria, but far too many people are still dying from these diseases, which are fully preventable. To end these epidemics, we need increased investment, accelerated innovation and a relentless focus on impact.

First, the good news. Today, a report shows that the Global Fund partnership has saved 27 million lives, while building resilient and sustainable systems of health. The report (link) explains how we have reduced deaths and infection rates, and demonstrates the catalytic power of international funding when invested in smart, effective programs.

African nations must renew their commitment and strengthen instruments to attain a malaria-free Africa by 2030, leaders heard today at a high-level briefing held on the margins of the 30th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa.

Senior health, finance and foreign affairs officials from across the continent were briefed on the latest findings from the World Health Organization (WHO)’s World Malaria Report 2017 signaling that, for the first time in more than a decade, progress against malaria on the African continent, which accounts for almost 90% of the global malaria burden, has stalled.

“Malaria alone is estimated to rob the continent of US$12 billion per year in lost productivity, investment and associated health care costs. It is therefore critical that we sustain the political commitment, as articulated in our continental Agenda 2063, to eliminate malaria in Africa by 2030 through increased domestic financing, increased access to life-saving malaria interventions, as well as more robust health systems,” said H.E. Moussa Faki Mahamat, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission.

The Chairperson of the EAC Sectoral Council of Ministers of Health and Minister of State Health in the Republic of Uganda Sarah Opendi has said that the region is committed to eliminate HIV/AIDs and preventable maternal and child deaths by 2030.

Opendi urged stakeholders to work diligently to build consensus in the health sector in order to build the health of the EAC population. Opendi was speaking during the official opening of the 1st EAC Roundtable on investing in Health Infrastructure, systems, services and research for the accelerated attainment of Universal Health coverage and sustainable development at the Speke Resort Munyonyo, in Kampala, Uganda.

 

It's the world's number one killer among infectious diseases, but tuberculosis has been eclipsed by HIV/AIDS as a focus of global attention and donor funding.

When world leaders gather at the United Nations next month, they will be asked to change that by committing to end the tuberculosis pandemic by 2030 and come up with $13 billion annually to achieve that goal.

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